History of Lahori Gate

On the west bank of the Yamuna River, on the eastern edge of the city walls of Delhi, stands the Red Fort. Residence and administrative center, was built from 1639 to 1648 under the supervision of two architects. It is a massive warlike structure with octagonal and round bastions and two symmetrical watchtowers overlooking the red sandstone walls that surround an irregular octagon 3200 by 1600 feet and are 100 feet high. It is surrounded by a deep moat fed by the river in the east. Only two major goals, the Lahori Gate (the main entrance) in the west wall and the Delhi Gate in the south wall, remain from the original five.

Inside the Lahori Gate is a shopping arcade called Chatta Chowk, which originally served the court of Shah Jahan. Behind it is the Drum House or Hathi Pol, a parking lot for the elephants of the visitors. Intricate carvings in sandstone are typical late Mughal design and were originally painted in gold and bright colors. Much of the original inner fort structure was destroyed, especially during the Indian Mutiny in 1857, and lawns and gardens now replace the galleries built inside the walls.

The audience hall between the inner courtyard and the royal palaces was the administrative center of the capital, but also an overwhelming venue. Much of its splendor has to be imagined now, but the marble roofed thrones with their classical style marble armature are still preserved. Six miniature palaces stood on the eastern wall of the fort, housing apartments for the royal household, including the harem. They were connected by the river of heaven; a small channel of fragrant waters that Nahr I Behisht. Five of these jewel buildings remain intact. On the east wall, but secluded behind a sandstone wall, are the royal baths, which face the pearl mosque built by Aurangzeb. The outer walls are aligned with the walls of the fort, but the inner walls are at an angle so that they are aligned with Mecca.

The living gardens, originally to the north of the mosque, were intended to mimic the gardens of Paradise and contain pavilions, fountains, and plants in a formal arrangement. Silver swings were hung on silk cords in pavilions so that the ladies of the court could watch the rain during the Hindu festival Teej, which marks the beginning of the monsoon. During your Delhi Agra tour package must visit red fort.

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